BIEN-ÊTRE
21/01/2016 08:38 EST | Actualisé 21/01/2016 08:39 EST

Richard Haines: la mode au bout du fusain

Excerpt with photo: "Can it be that our little Mary's growing up at last?  There's a new, spirited air about the Brian girl here pictured.  In addition, of course, to a new and pretty print dress.  Mary's going ahead fast for Paramount.  Heigh ho!  It's a long, long trail back to her good old Wendy days in the "Peter Pan" era."

"Mary Brian (February 17, 1906 – December 30, 2002) was an American actress and movie star who made the transition from 'silents' to 'talkies.

Her father died when she was one month old and the family later moved to Dallas. In the early 1920s, they moved to Long Beach, California. She had intended becoming an illustrator but that was laid aside when at age 16 she was discovered in a local bathing beauty contest. One of the judges was famous motion picture star Esther Ralston (who was to play her mother in the upcoming Peter Pan and who became a lifelong friend).

She didn't win the $25 prize in the contest but Ralston said, "you've got to give the little girl something." So, her prize was to be interviewed by director Herbert Brenon for a role in Peter Pan. Brenon was recovering from eye surgery, and she spoke with him in a dimly lit room. "He asked me a few questions, Is that your hair? Out of the blue, he said, I would like to make a test. Even to this day, I will never know why I was that lucky. They had made tests of every ingénue in the business for Wendy. He had decided he would go with an unknown. It would seem more like a fairy tale. It wouldn't seem right if the roles were to be taken by someone they (the audience) knew or was divorced. I got the part. They put me under contract." The studio renamed her Mary Brian.

After her showing in the beauty contest, she was given an audition by Paramount Pictures and cast by director Herbert Brenon as Wendy Darling in his silent movie version of J. M. Barrie's Peter Pan (1924). There she starred with Betty Bronson and Esther Ralston, and the three of them stayed close for the rest of their lives. Ralston described both Bronson and Brian as 'very charming people'.

The studio, who created her stage name for the movie and said she was age 16 instead of 18, because the latter sounded too old for the role, then signed her to a long-term motion picture contract. Brian played Fancy Vanhern, daughter of Percy Marmont, in Brenon's The Street of Forgotten Men (1925), which had newcomer Louise Brooks in an uncredited debut role as a moll.

Brian was dubbed "The Sweetest Girl in Pictures." On loan-out to MGM, she played a college belle, Mary Abbott, opposite William Haines and Jack Pickford in Brown of Harvard (1926). She was named one of the WAMPAS Baby Stars in 1926, along with Mary Astor, Dolores Costello, Joan Crawford, Dolores del Río, Janet Gaynor, and Fay Wray.

During her years at Paramount, Brian appeared in more than 40 movies as the juvenile lead, the ingenue or co-star. She worked with Brenon again in 1926 when she played Isabel in P. C. Wren's Beau Geste starring Ronald Colman. That same year she made Behind the Front and Harold Teen. In 1928, she played ingenue Alice Deane in Forgotten Faces opposite Clive Brook, her sacrificing father, with Olga Baclanova as her vixen mother and William Powell as Froggy. Like many of Brian's Paramount movies, Forgotten Faces, which was a big box-office hit, is presumed lost.

Her first talkie was Varsity (1928), which was filmed with part-sound and talking sequences, opposite Buddy Rogers. After successfully making the transition to sound, she co-starred with Gary Cooper, Walter Huston and Richard Arlen in one of the earliest Western talkies, The Virginian (1929), her first all-talkie feature. In it, she played a spirited frontier heroine, schoolmarm Molly Stark Wood, who was the love interest of the Virginian (Cooper).

Brian co-starred in several hits during the 1930s, including her role as Gwen Cavendish in George Cukor’s comedy The Royal Family of Broadway (1930) with Ina Claire and Fredric March, as herself in Paramount's all-star revue Paramount on Parade (1930), as Peggy Grant in Lewis Milestone’s comedy The Front Page (1931) with Adolphe Menjou and Pat O'Brien.

After her contract with Paramount ended in 1932, Brian freelanced. That same year, she appeared on the vaudeville stage at New York's Palace Theatre. Also in the same year,she starred in Manhattan Tower.

Other movie roles include Murial Ross, aka Murial Rossi, in Shadows of Sing Sing (1933), in which she received top billing, Gloria Van Dayham in College Rhythm (1934), Yvette Lamartine in Charlie Chan in Paris (1935), Hope Wolfinger, W. C. Fields’s daughter, in Man on the Flying Trapeze (1935), Sally Barnaby in Spendthrift (1936) opposite Henry Fonda, and Doris in Navy Blues (1937), in which she received top billing.

In 1936, she went to England and made three movies, including The Amazing Quest of Ernest Bliss in which she starred opposite Cary Grant, to whom she became engaged at one stage.

Her final film of the 1930s was Affairs of Cappy Ricks although she auditioned unsuccessfully for the part that would go to Janet Gaynor in A Star is Born.

Brian was absent from the screen from 1937 to 1943, and appeared in only a handful of films thereafter. Her last performance on the silver screen was in Dragnet (1947), a B-movie in which she played Anne Hogan opposite Henry Wilcoxon. Over the course of 22 years, Brian had appeared in more than 79 movies." Credit: Wikipedia
The Bees Knees Daily/Flickr
Excerpt with photo: "Can it be that our little Mary's growing up at last? There's a new, spirited air about the Brian girl here pictured. In addition, of course, to a new and pretty print dress. Mary's going ahead fast for Paramount. Heigh ho! It's a long, long trail back to her good old Wendy days in the "Peter Pan" era." "Mary Brian (February 17, 1906 – December 30, 2002) was an American actress and movie star who made the transition from 'silents' to 'talkies. Her father died when she was one month old and the family later moved to Dallas. In the early 1920s, they moved to Long Beach, California. She had intended becoming an illustrator but that was laid aside when at age 16 she was discovered in a local bathing beauty contest. One of the judges was famous motion picture star Esther Ralston (who was to play her mother in the upcoming Peter Pan and who became a lifelong friend). She didn't win the $25 prize in the contest but Ralston said, "you've got to give the little girl something." So, her prize was to be interviewed by director Herbert Brenon for a role in Peter Pan. Brenon was recovering from eye surgery, and she spoke with him in a dimly lit room. "He asked me a few questions, Is that your hair? Out of the blue, he said, I would like to make a test. Even to this day, I will never know why I was that lucky. They had made tests of every ingénue in the business for Wendy. He had decided he would go with an unknown. It would seem more like a fairy tale. It wouldn't seem right if the roles were to be taken by someone they (the audience) knew or was divorced. I got the part. They put me under contract." The studio renamed her Mary Brian. After her showing in the beauty contest, she was given an audition by Paramount Pictures and cast by director Herbert Brenon as Wendy Darling in his silent movie version of J. M. Barrie's Peter Pan (1924). There she starred with Betty Bronson and Esther Ralston, and the three of them stayed close for the rest of their lives. Ralston described both Bronson and Brian as 'very charming people'. The studio, who created her stage name for the movie and said she was age 16 instead of 18, because the latter sounded too old for the role, then signed her to a long-term motion picture contract. Brian played Fancy Vanhern, daughter of Percy Marmont, in Brenon's The Street of Forgotten Men (1925), which had newcomer Louise Brooks in an uncredited debut role as a moll. Brian was dubbed "The Sweetest Girl in Pictures." On loan-out to MGM, she played a college belle, Mary Abbott, opposite William Haines and Jack Pickford in Brown of Harvard (1926). She was named one of the WAMPAS Baby Stars in 1926, along with Mary Astor, Dolores Costello, Joan Crawford, Dolores del Río, Janet Gaynor, and Fay Wray. During her years at Paramount, Brian appeared in more than 40 movies as the juvenile lead, the ingenue or co-star. She worked with Brenon again in 1926 when she played Isabel in P. C. Wren's Beau Geste starring Ronald Colman. That same year she made Behind the Front and Harold Teen. In 1928, she played ingenue Alice Deane in Forgotten Faces opposite Clive Brook, her sacrificing father, with Olga Baclanova as her vixen mother and William Powell as Froggy. Like many of Brian's Paramount movies, Forgotten Faces, which was a big box-office hit, is presumed lost. Her first talkie was Varsity (1928), which was filmed with part-sound and talking sequences, opposite Buddy Rogers. After successfully making the transition to sound, she co-starred with Gary Cooper, Walter Huston and Richard Arlen in one of the earliest Western talkies, The Virginian (1929), her first all-talkie feature. In it, she played a spirited frontier heroine, schoolmarm Molly Stark Wood, who was the love interest of the Virginian (Cooper). Brian co-starred in several hits during the 1930s, including her role as Gwen Cavendish in George Cukor’s comedy The Royal Family of Broadway (1930) with Ina Claire and Fredric March, as herself in Paramount's all-star revue Paramount on Parade (1930), as Peggy Grant in Lewis Milestone’s comedy The Front Page (1931) with Adolphe Menjou and Pat O'Brien. After her contract with Paramount ended in 1932, Brian freelanced. That same year, she appeared on the vaudeville stage at New York's Palace Theatre. Also in the same year,she starred in Manhattan Tower. Other movie roles include Murial Ross, aka Murial Rossi, in Shadows of Sing Sing (1933), in which she received top billing, Gloria Van Dayham in College Rhythm (1934), Yvette Lamartine in Charlie Chan in Paris (1935), Hope Wolfinger, W. C. Fields’s daughter, in Man on the Flying Trapeze (1935), Sally Barnaby in Spendthrift (1936) opposite Henry Fonda, and Doris in Navy Blues (1937), in which she received top billing. In 1936, she went to England and made three movies, including The Amazing Quest of Ernest Bliss in which she starred opposite Cary Grant, to whom she became engaged at one stage. Her final film of the 1930s was Affairs of Cappy Ricks although she auditioned unsuccessfully for the part that would go to Janet Gaynor in A Star is Born. Brian was absent from the screen from 1937 to 1943, and appeared in only a handful of films thereafter. Her last performance on the silver screen was in Dragnet (1947), a B-movie in which she played Anne Hogan opposite Henry Wilcoxon. Over the course of 22 years, Brian had appeared in more than 79 movies." Credit: Wikipedia

A cinq ans déjà, il préférait dessiner les robes aux avions. Après un "détour" de trente ans comme styliste, l'Américain Richard Haines est revenu à l'illustration de mode, activité en plein renouveau à une époque où règne la photo numérique.

Alors que la Semaine de mode masculine bat son plein à Paris, une quarantaine de dessins de ce New-Yorkais sont exposés à la galerie Huberty & Breyne à Paris de vendredi jusqu'au 6 février.

De son trait rapide et vibrant, il a capturé au fusain et à l'acrylique une Gabrielle Chanel les yeux clos, croquée au crayon jeunes hommes, hipsters et artistes de son quartier de Brooklyn, comme une jeune drag queen, maquillage coulant, affublée de deux singulières oreilles d'animal sur ses cheveux blonds.

"Quand je suis arrivé à New York dans les années 1970, l'illustration de mode était sur le déclin. Les publicités illustrées dans la presse avaient fait place aux photographies", raconte cet artiste de 64 ans à l'AFP.

Il se met alors à travailler comme styliste pour les marques Calvin Klein, Perry Ellis, Bill Blass. En 2008, avec la crise, le travail manque, il n'a plus d'argent et s'installe dans l'appartement qu'un ami met à sa disposition à Bushwick.

Dans ce coin de Brooklyn en pleine gentrification, il se fascine pour le "théâtre" de la rue et la créativité des looks qu'il observe. Il commence un blogue, "What I Saw today", qui connaît vite le succès.

"A la minute où j'ai commencé, je me suis aperçu que c'était ce que je préférais, ce pour quoi j'étais fait, après un détour de 30 ans!"

Cet habitué des Fashion Weeks a travaillé pour les magazines GQ, Paper, pour le New York Times, mais également pour des maisons de mode comme Prada et Dries Van Noten.

Comme lui ont émergé une série de blogueurs et dessinateurs de mode qui s'expriment sur Instagram, dans la presse magazine et séduisent les créateurs: la Californienne Carly Kuhn, alias @thecartorialist, la New-Yorkaise Kelly Beeman ou encore le Britannique Sean Ryan et ses top models aux visages étranges.

Richard Haines dit particulièrement apprécier le travail du français Jean-Philippe Delhomme et du Britannique David Downton, installés dans le paysage depuis plus longtemps.

-Côté humain du dessin

Ce regain d'engouement pour l'illustration s'explique, selon lui, par la multiplication des médias, Instagram, Facebook, YouTube, Vimeo... Et puis, "les gens apprécient le côté humain du dessin, c'est comme un soulagement face à toutes les images photographiques", dit-il, bonnet vissé sur la tête et lunettes épaisses.

"Il y a des erreurs dans le dessin, ce n'est pas parfait. Tout le reste est tellement +photoshopé+, les gens aiment quelque chose qui a été fait de la main de l'homme", poursuit Richard Haines, qui cite Toulouse-Lautrec comme l'un de ses artistes de référence.

Mais aussi Christian Bérard, illustrateur de mode français des années 1930. "La dernière fois, je suis allé au cimetière du Père Lachaise, il est enterré là-bas, et j'étais tellement ému que je lui ai laissé un mot", s'amuse-t-il. «Alors que tout le monde se précipite sur la tombe de Jim Morrison ou Oscar Wilde!»

Pour ce fils de militaire né au Panama, qui a grandi en Virginie, le dessin de mode était une vocation précoce. «Mon père me disait: +dessine donc des cowboys, des avions!+, il était un peu embarrassé... Moi je ne dessinais que de la mode!»

Richard Haines, qui a notamment collaboré avec Dries Van Noten pour sa collection été 2015 en dessinant des imprimés et avec Prada pour un recueil de portraits, juge que son expérience de styliste l'aide dans ses relations de travail avec les créateurs.

La mode actuelle, il ne la trouve pas moins enthousiasmante qu'avant. «Beaucoup de gens disent, ce n'est plus pareil, c'est ennuyeux. Mais il se passe toujours des choses! Il faut chercher. Moi, je continue à trouver des choses vraiment excitantes, c'est ce qui me fait continuer».

Abonnez-vous à HuffPost Québec Style sur Facebook
Suivez HuffPost Québec Style sur Twitter