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Alex Neve

Secrétaire général d'Amnesty International Canada

Alex Neve believes in a world in which the human rights of all people are protected. He has been a member of Amnesty International since 1985 and has served as Secretary General of Amnesty International Canada since 2000. In that role he has carried out numerous human rights research missions throughout Africa and Latin America, and closer to home to such locations as Grassy Narrows First Nation in NW Ontario and to Guantánamo Bay. He speaks to audiences across the country about a wide range of human rights issues, appears regularly before parliamentary committees and UN bodies, and is a frequent commentator in the media. Alex is a lawyer, with an LLB from Dalhousie University and a Masters Degree in International Human Rights Law from the University of Essex. He has served as a member of the Immigration and Refugee Board, taught at Osgoode Hall Law School and the University of Ottawa, been affiliated with York University's Centre for Refugee Studies, and worked as a refugee lawyer in private practice and in a community legal aid clinic. He is on the Board of Directors of Partnership Africa Canada, the Canadian Centre for International Justice and the Centre for Law and Democracy. Alex has been named an Officer of the Order of Canada, a Trudeau Foundation Mentor and has received an honorary Doctorate of Laws degree from the University of New Brunswick.
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2017 au Canada: plus de droits humains, pas moins

Qu'attendons-nous du Canada ? Qu'il se porte à la défense des droits humains partout dans le monde. De nombreuses pressions seront exercées sur le premier ministre Trudeau afin qu'il influence ses nouveaux homologues, qui ont pris le pouvoir en misant sur la discrimination et la division.
23/01/2017 08:24 EST
ASSOCIATED PRESS

M. Harper, il faut faire quelque chose

C'est le moment d'agir, Monsieur le premier ministre. En raison de l'état d'urgence et de la gravité de la situation, vos qualités de dirigeant sont requises. Le Canada doit accepter sa part de responsabilité et renforcer son intervention.
05/09/2015 08:50 EDT