Ce koala a probablement eu la pire journée de sa vie.

Le petit animal voulait retourner à son habitat, à New South Wales, en Australie, chose qu'il n'a pu faire puisque des exploitants forestiers avaient tout rasé la semaine dernière. Un collaborateur pour WIRES et un employé de NSW National Parks ont affirmé que le jeune koala avait dû passer plus d'une heure à cet endroit, sur cet amoncellement de bois, complètement désorienté.

koala photo

Le koala a ensuite été présenté à un vétérinaire local puis, remis en liberté avec d'autres koalas dans un environnement avoisinant.

La photo présentée démontre bien la triste réalité à laquelle les animaux australiens doivent faire face actuellement. Destruction de leur habitat, épidémie de chlamydia mortelle; l'espérance de vie des koalas diminue, tellement que le gouvernement australien a même annoncé l'an dernier que la survie de l'animal était menacée dans certaines régions.

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  • Zoo Babies 2012

    Bonobo baby Sambo looks into the camera in the zoo of Frankfurt, Germany, Tuesday, April 24, 2012. The male chimpanzee baby was born on January 7 and had to be raised by hand. During the next days the baby will meet with his fellow species in the zoo. (Michael Probst, AP)

  • Zoo Babies 2012

    In this photo provided by the San Diego Zoo, Riki-san, a 14-week-old clouded leopard at the San Diego Zoo, and his brother, Haui-san, unseen, make their public debut at the San Diego Zoo Thursday, Dec. 6, 2012. According to zookeepers, 13-pound Riki-san, although larger than his brother Haui-san, is the more timid cat and his coat pattern is darker and his rosettes more pronounced. The two male cubs arrived earlier this week from the Nashville Zoo at Grassmere, where a very successful breeding program has helped to increase the population of this critically endangered species. (Ken Bohn, San Diego Zoo / AP)

  • Zoo Babies 2012

  • Zoo Babies 2012

  • Zoo Babies 2012

    A dolphin calf was born Saturday morning 6/30/12 at 8:47 a.m. at SeaWorld Orlando. The young calf's sex is unknown at this time, but it has been seen nursing and bonding with its mom, Starkey, both a good indication that the calf is doing well. This is Starkey's sixth birth. Park guests can see the pair at SeaWorld's Dolphin Nursery where pregnant dolphins, new mothers, their calves and experienced moms live together.

  • Zoo Babies 2012

    Snow Monkey Arrivals The resident Japanese macaque (snow monkey) troop at the Highland Wildlife Park recently welcomed new arrivals when a trio of babies were born. The three latest additions belong to mums Mang, Djangal and Angara. Still only 3 weeks old, the babies are staying close to their mums and it will be a while yet before they venture further on their own. (All three infants were born between the 21st and the 25th of April 2012) There are now 21 Japanese macaques living at the Highland Wildlife Park. Angara is the dominant female of the group, and also a first time mum, making her new arrival a very important addition to their social group. It will be a while yet before keepers are able to tell what sex the babies are, so they won't be named until then, but keepers are already noticing their different characters starting to come through, with one in particular being a little more boisterous than the others! Japanese macaques are found throughout Japan, living in large troupes in woodland and sub-tropical forests. Instantly recognisable due to their bright red faces and white fur, these primates are fully adapted to seasonal climate changes as temperatures in Japan can plummet to as low as -15°C in the winter, making their Scottish Highland home ideal.

  • Zoo Babies 2012

    A new born orang-utan baby looks like smiling while hanging on its mother at the zoo in Gelsenkirchen, Germany, Monday, Aug. 20, 2012. The little ape was born only three days ago on Friday. Mother Sexta is nearly 40 years old and nobody expected her to give birth at that age. Last time she was pregnant was 22 years ago. (Martin Meissner, AP)

  • Zoo Babies 2012

    Twin baby panthers Remaong and Ferra cling to their basket while being presented to the media at Tierpark Berlin zoo on July 13, 2012 in Berlin, Germany. The two panthers were born in captivity on April 26. (Sean Gallup, Getty Images)

  • Zoo Babies 2012

    Baby Boom in the Highlands Late spring usually sees a spate of births at the Highland Wildlife Park, and we have recently welcomed four new arrivals to their new home in the Highlands. The four new-borns include a European elk calf, a Bukhara deer calf and two more European bison babies. The deer and bison youngsters are particularly welcome as both species are threatened in the wild. First time European elk mum, Froja who was born at the Wildlife Park in 2010, is proving to be a perfect parent. Historically these impressive animals could be found in the Scottish Highlands, and this latest arrival is the 4th elk calf born at the Park since we started breeding this interesting species in 2009. It will be a little while longer before keepers will be able to sex this calf, who was born on 15th May, as it is keeping close to its protective new parent. More experienced at the parenting game, the Bukhara deer welcomed another calf to the herd. This little youngster, who is doting mum Mariam's 3rd calf, was born on 26th May and is a female but she has yet to be named. Following the birth of our first European bison calf, Glen Garry, on May 1st, a further two were born on the 26th and 31st of May. These three calves are the first offspring of our Irish-born bull, Tomek, who arrived at the Park in July 2011 Douglas Richardson, Animal Collections Manager at the Highland Wildlife Park, said: "As all of our animals are adapted to dealing with cold winters, late spring is usually when we start to see births from our hoofed mammals as they are generally very seasonal breeders. I am particularly pleased by the birth of a further two European bison calves as it is now looking like our new bull has justified his move from Ireland. The two latest bison mums are proving to be as protective of their calves as the mother of our first calf of the year. It is also gratifying to know that our herd is continuing to contribute to the European breeding programme for this endangered species, which we manage. "The husbandry of European elk presents a number of difficulties, but the fact that first-time mum Froja, who was also born at the Park, is proving to be an attentive parent indicates to us that we are caring for this demanding species in an appropriate way. "Lastly, our adult Bukhara deer female has had their third healthy calf in as many years. Bigger than their red relatives, their young can be easily identified due to their much darker coat that is covered in bright white spots. Our group is the only breeding herd of Bukhara deer in the UK, and like the bison they are part of a European breeding programme, and we are proud to be able to continue to help grow the population of this threatened deer". Photos should be credited to Jan Morse

  • Zoo Babies 2012

    A female baby bonobo was born at the Columbus Zoo and Aquarium Tuesday morning to the delight of Zoo staff and volunteers. This is the 13th bonobo born at the Columbus Zoo since the Zoo received its first bonobos in 1990 in conjunction with the Species Survival Plan (SSP) for this endangered ape. This is the third baby for mother "Unga" who is caring for the newborn in the company of the other bonobos in her group. "Unga" has given birth to two other bonobos, both boys, "Gander", born in 2003 and "Jerry", born in 2008. All still reside at the Columbus Zoo. Bonobos and people share more than 98% of the same DNA; in fact, bonobos and chimpanzees are more closely related genetically to humans than they are to gorillas. The bonobo is the smallest of the great apes and is a separate species from the chimpanzee. Females give birth to a single baby after a gestation period of approximately 8.5 months. Bonobos were the last of the great apes to be discovered and are the rarest with only 5,000-50,000 living in the equatorial forests of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). The primary threat to the endangered bonobo is human behavior, mainly habitat destruction caused by logging. A secondary threat is the hunting of bonobos for bushmeat for native consumption and for sale to logging companies and markets. Recognizing the desperate situation bonobos face in the wild, the Columbus Zoo supports the Congolese association ABC - Les Amis des Bonobos du Congo (Friends of Bonobos in Congo). ABC operates Lola ya Bonobo Sanctuary, the only sanctuary in the world for bonobos confiscated from the illegal bushmeat and pet trades. ABC has advocated for wildlife conservation throughout the Democratic Republic of Congo for the past 10 years. ABC's mission is "to contribute to the protection of bonobos in their natural environment through educational programs, advocacy work and the facilitation of behavioral research." The Zoo also supports field-based projects to protect wild bonobos and their forest habitat, including the work of the African Wildlife Foundation's Congo Heartland Program. The Columbus Zoo and Aquarium contributes $1 million annually to more than 70 conservation projects in 30 countries. Since 1993 over $1 million has been awarded to Ape Conservation and nearly $350,000 has been given specifically to bonobos. Monies are raised from private contributions and fundraising activities including Wine for Wildlife held each fall at the Zoo. "We are committed to saving the bonobo through the excellent care given to these amazing animals at the Zoo and by providing significant support for conservation programs in Africa" said Dale Schmidt, President and CEO of the Columbus Zoo and Aquarium.

  • Zoo Babies 2012

    The four weeks old leopard cub Imoo sits at Nyiregyhaza Animal Park in Nyiregyhaza, 227 kms northeast of Budapest, Hungary, Thursday, April 5, 2012. The cub's name means darkness in Swahili language. Imoo’s parents have lived in the zoo since 2007. (Attila Balazs, MTI / AP)

  • Zoo Babies 2012

    The Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden has celebrated not one, but two big-baby births during its 26th annual Zoo Babies Celebration! On Wednesday, May 23, at 3:20 p.m., the Zoo's female Grevy's Zebra "Lainey Lyn" gave birth to a healthy 103 pound baby girl. This is the second Grevy's zebra birth in the past three years for the Cincinnati Zoo's breeding pair, mother "Lainey Lyn" and father "Shewa." The last birth was male, "Marty," born in 2009.

  • Zoo Babies 2012

    A Coquerel's sifaka, born this spring, clings to its mother's back as she perches on a branch in the Madagascar! exhibit at the Wildlife Conservation Society's Bronx Zoo. A collared lemur, also born this spring, curls up to its mother as she reclines on a rock. All lemur species are endemic to the island nation of Madagascar. Both the sifaka and the collared lemur are seeing dramatic declines in population due to loss of suitable habitat. The IUCN has designated the Coquerel's sifaka as an Endangered Species and the collared lemur is listed as Vulnerable. Coquerel's sifakas spend most of their time in trees and leap effortlessly, launching themselves vertically with their strong legs. Like most species of lemurs, the females are dominant to the males, claiming the choicest food and the best sleeping and sunning spots. Collared lemurs use their long tails to balance when leaping through the forest canopy. Collared lemurs live in groups of males and females but are not matriarchal like the sifaka and many other lemurs. There are five species of lemurs on exhibit in Madagascar! along with many other animals unique to the African island. Opened in 2008, Madagascar! educates zoo visitors about the country's incredible biodiversity and the challenges it faces. The Wildlife Conservation Society works in Madagascar to protect lemurs and other wildlife

  • Zoo Babies 2012

    This image provided by the San Diego Zoo shows the zoo's 11-week-old giant panda cub taking his first steps during a veterinay examination Thursday Oct. 18, 2012 in San Diego. The unnamed male cub is the sixth giant panda born at the San Diego Zoo. (Ken Bohn, San Diego Zoo / AP)

  • Zoo Babies 2012

    Spring is in the Air at the Wildlife Conservation Society's Zoos and Aquarium Lamb born at Central Park Zoo signals the end of winter WCS zoos and aquarium make change to spring/summer hours New York - March 27 , 2012 - Attached Photo: March went in and out like a lamb this year - as shown with this new babydoll lamb at the Central Park Zoo's Tisch Children's Zoo. Born earlier in the month to mother, Turnip, and father, Sid, the arrival of the lamb, Kiwi, is a sure sign that spring is upon us.

  • Zoo Babies 2012

    Earlier this month, Busch Gardens witnessed an uncommon event: the birth of mongoose lemur twins. On Friday, April 6, the two babies were born to 17-year-old mother Rosalita and 18-year-old father Guillermo. Rosalita's first baby - a male named Duggan - was also born at Busch Gardens and moved to another zoo for breeding. Mongoose lemurs are classified as a "vulnerable" species, and Busch Gardens takes part in Species Survival Plans (SSP) initiated by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) to cooperatively manage breeding programs for threatened or endangered species in accredited institutions. Busch Gardens zoo staff aren't yet sure if the new babies are male or female. All baby mongoose lemurs look the same at birth, but around 6-8 months of age, males start to change color and develop their red "beard" and cheeks. Females have a darker face and white beard. The mongoose lemur, like all lemurs, is indigenous to the island of Madagascar in the Indian Ocean, but they are one of only two species of lemur to also live in an area outside the island: mongoose lemurs can be found on the Comoros Islands between Madagascar and Africa.

  • Zoo Babies 2012

    Last week twin sea lions were born at SeaWorld Orlando. This is very rare in the animal world and the first time twin sea lions have been born here at SeaWorld. The baby sea lions are healthy and have been seen nursing from their mom, Fable, who is also doing well. The pups will continue to nurse from their mom until they are between six and 12 months old. Fable, who is nearly 14 years old, was also born at SeaWorld Orlando. The first of the twins was born at 11 a.m. and the second followed a few hours later. The sex of the twins has not yet been determined. Sea lions typically give birth to one pup at a time so this is a grand feat for Mom.

  • Zoo Babies 2012

    A male dromedary camel calf at the Wildlife Conservation Society's Bronx Zoo stays close to its mother in Wild Asia. This calf is the first camel born at the Bronx Zoo since 1982. It weighed approximately 80 pounds at birth on March 16, and could grow to be over 1,500 pounds as an adult. Dromedary camels are native to Northern Africa and Arabic regions of Asia. They have one hump which easily distinguishes them from their two-humped cousin, the bactrian camel. The Bronx Zoo has 12 dromedary camels and one bactrian camel. Although most camels are tan or brown, they can range from white to black. The new calf is the only white camel in the zoo's herd. Visitors to WCS's Bronx Zoo can ride one of the adult camels at Asia Plaza. The calf is now on exhibit at Wild Asia.

  • Zoo Babies 2012

    In this Oct. 15, 2012 photo provided by the Lincoln Park Zoo in Chicago, a newborn western lowland gorilla, born on Oct. 11, cuddles with its mother Bana, 17, at the zoo. The baby has yet to be sexed or named and appears to be doing well. Zookeepers and vets will closely monitor Bana and her baby to ensure they continue to do well, as the first few weeks are critical in the survival of newborn gorillas. (Tony Gnau, Lincoln Park Zoo / AP)

  • Zoo Babies 2012

    The International Rhino Foundation (IRF) and the Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden are pleased to announce the birth of a bouncing baby boy Sumatran rhino! The calf was born to mother, "Ratu", a 12-year-old Sumatran rhino living at the Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary in Indonesia's Way Kambas National Park and father, "Andalas," born at the Cincinnati Zoo in 2001 and the first Sumatran Rhino calf born in captivity in 112 years. In 2007 he was sent to the Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary with hopes that he would eventually sire calves with one or more of the females at the Sanctuary. The healthy and active calf was born on June 23 at 12:46 a.m. with no complications and weighs 60-70 pounds. He was attended by Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary veterinarians, Ratu's keepers and advisors from the Cincinnati Zoo and Taronga Conservation Society Australia. Ratu gave birth after two hours of second-stage labor and several days of restlessness. The calf stood about an hour after birth and began nursing almost immediately. Ratu is a very good mother. "To say that we are thrilled is an understatement," said Dr. Terri Roth, Vice President of Conservation and Science and Director of the Cincinnati Zoo's Lindner Center for Conservation and Research of Endangered Wildlife (CREW). "When we celebrated the monumental birth of Andalas at the Cincinnati Zoo in 2001, we never imagined he would play such a pivotal role in the survival of his species. This international collaboration is conservation work at its finest." Dr. Roth has been working in SE Asia for over a decade. There are currently fewer than 200 Sumatran rhinos living in Indonesia and Malaysia. This is the first birth of a Sumatran rhino in an Indonesian facility and the first birth in an Asian facility in 124 years. "We are overjoyed that Ratu delivered a healthy calf and are cautiously optimistic that the calf will continue to thrive," said Dr. Susie Ellis, executive director of the International Rhino Foundation. "The little guy is absolutely adorable, and none of us has been able to stop smiling since the moment we were sure he was alive and healthy. We have been waiting for this moment since the sanctuary was built in 1998. The International Rhino Foundation is honored to play an important role in protecting rhinos. We are hopeful the Sumatran rhino population will thrive once again." Dr. Dedi Candra, head veterinarian and animal collections manager at the Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary, has been monitoring Ratu's pregnancy by weighing her weekly and conducting regular ultrasound exams, using methods developed by CREW at the Cincinnati Zoo. "We have been waiting for this moment since Ratu wandered from the forest in 2005," Candra said. To assist her in having a successful pregnancy, Ratu was prescribed a hormone supplement that was given orally every day. It was gradually withdrawn as the expected delivery date neared. Dr. Terri Roth provided the protocol and dosage. Andalas's mother, who also experienced pregnancy complications prior to his birth in the Cincinnati Zoo, was given the same hormone. The Sumatran rhino is seriously threatened by the continuing loss of its tropical forest habitat and hunting pressure from poachers, who kill rhinos for their valuable horns. The IRF operates Rhino Protection Units in two of the three remaining habitats to ensure that the wild population and its habitat are protected. Every successful birth is critical for the survival of the species, which runs the risk of extinction by the end of this century. The International Rhino Foundation was created in 1993 and is dedicated to the survival of the world's rhino species through conservation and research. IRF through its on the ground partner, the Rhino Foundation of Indonesia, funds the operation of the Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary and supports Rhino Protection Units that safeguard the last remaining wild populations of Sumatran and Javan rhinos.

  • Zoo Babies 2012

    Hani, a baby Somali wild ass, left, stands with her mother Lisha, right, at Zoo Miami, Sunday, Aug. 19, 2012, in Miami. Lisha was already pregnant when she arrived in Miami last year from the San Diego Zoo as part of a breeding conservation program. There are less than 1,000 Somali wild asses remaining in Eastern Africa. (Lynne Sladky, AP)

  • Zoo Babies 2012

    CCTV photo released by the Wuppertal, western Germany, Zoo, Tuesday, Feb. 14, 2012 shows five-weeks-old polar bear cub Anori with its eyes opened. The polar bear was born Jan. 4 and lives with its mother in a cave. (Wuppertal Zoo / AP)

  • Zoo Babies 2012

    Squirrel Monkey, Anteater and a Kangaroo are Among the New Arrivals Busch Gardens is celebrating the arrival of a baby squirrel monkey, giant anteater and kangaroo. Since the new squirrel monkey and anteater were both born in June, the animals' keepers are not sure if the babies are male or female. Once the keepers are able to identify the genders, the animals will be named. The baby squirrel monkey is extremely curious and spends most of its day riding around on its mother's back. The new anteater is only a month old and currently weighs less than 5 lbs. The baby will grow up to weigh more than 100 lbs like its parents, Adelhi (mother) and Buddy (father). Anteater babies nurse for six months and are carried on their mothers' backs for up to a year. Busch Gardens' newest joey was named Louis by his keepers at Walkabout Way. He currently weighs less than 10 pounds and spends most of his day in the pouch of his mother, Lulu. When he becomes confident enough to spend the majority of his day outside of the pouch, he will join the kangaroo mob at Walkabout Way. These babies are all currently being raised by their parents in private areas and they will soon be welcomed to guest viewing areas around the park. Like Busch Gardens on Facebook, follow the park on Twitter or read the Busch Gardens blog to learn more.

  • Zoo Babies 2012

    Baby Boom in the Highlands Late spring usually sees a spate of births at the Highland Wildlife Park, and we have recently welcomed four new arrivals to their new home in the Highlands. The four new-borns include a European elk calf, a Bukhara deer calf and two more European bison babies. The deer and bison youngsters are particularly welcome as both species are threatened in the wild. First time European elk mum, Froja who was born at the Wildlife Park in 2010, is proving to be a perfect parent. Historically these impressive animals could be found in the Scottish Highlands, and this latest arrival is the 4th elk calf born at the Park since we started breeding this interesting species in 2009. It will be a little while longer before keepers will be able to sex this calf, who was born on 15th May, as it is keeping close to its protective new parent. More experienced at the parenting game, the Bukhara deer welcomed another calf to the herd. This little youngster, who is doting mum Mariam's 3rd calf, was born on 26th May and is a female but she has yet to be named. Following the birth of our first European bison calf, Glen Garry, on May 1st, a further two were born on the 26th and 31st of May. These three calves are the first offspring of our Irish-born bull, Tomek, who arrived at the Park in July 2011 Douglas Richardson, Animal Collections Manager at the Highland Wildlife Park, said: "As all of our animals are adapted to dealing with cold winters, late spring is usually when we start to see births from our hoofed mammals as they are generally very seasonal breeders. I am particularly pleased by the birth of a further two European bison calves as it is now looking like our new bull has justified his move from Ireland. The two latest bison mums are proving to be as protective of their calves as the mother of our first calf of the year. It is also gratifying to know that our herd is continuing to contribute to the European breeding programme for this endangered species, which we manage. "The husbandry of European elk presents a number of difficulties, but the fact that first-time mum Froja, who was also born at the Park, is proving to be an attentive parent indicates to us that we are caring for this demanding species in an appropriate way. "Lastly, our adult Bukhara deer female has had their third healthy calf in as many years. Bigger than their red relatives, their young can be easily identified due to their much darker coat that is covered in bright white spots. Our group is the only breeding herd of Bukhara deer in the UK, and like the bison they are part of a European breeding programme, and we are proud to be able to continue to help grow the population of this threatened deer". Photos should be credited to Jan Morse

  • Zoo Babies 2012

    A baby lar gibbon known as "Knuppy" is seen at a private Zoo in Bremen, northern Germany, Friday, April 13, 2012. The lar gibbon, which was rejected by its mother, is now in the care of zoo owner Renate Anders. (Joerg Sarbach, dapd / AP)

  • Zoo Babies 2012

    A keeper pets a newborn South American female tapir baby in the Debrecen Zoo in Debrecen, 226 kilometers east of Budapest, Hungary, Monday, April 16, 2012. The cub was born in the night of Sunday, April 15 with the weight of 6,000 grams, and her parents came to the zoo in March 2011 in the framework of a species conservation program. (Zsolt Czegledi, MTI / AP)

  • Zoo Babies 2012

    In this April 27, 2012 photo provided by the Wildlife Conservation Society, a juvenile collared lemur, top, embraces its mother while reclining on a rock at the Bronx Zoo’s Madagascar! Exhibit. The baby lemur was born at the zoo this spring but lemurs can only be found in the wild on the island of Madagascar. (Julie Larsen Maher, WCS / AP)

  • Zoo Babies 2012

    Moka, an endangered western lowland Gorilla, plays with her unnamed 3-month-old baby at the Pittsburgh Zoo and Aquarium in Pittsburgh Wednesday, May 2, 2012. (Gene J. Puskar, AP)

  • Zoo Babies 2012

    Baby Boom in the Highlands Late spring usually sees a spate of births at the Highland Wildlife Park, and we have recently welcomed four new arrivals to their new home in the Highlands. The four new-borns include a European elk calf, a Bukhara deer calf and two more European bison babies. The deer and bison youngsters are particularly welcome as both species are threatened in the wild. First time European elk mum, Froja who was born at the Wildlife Park in 2010, is proving to be a perfect parent. Historically these impressive animals could be found in the Scottish Highlands, and this latest arrival is the 4th elk calf born at the Park since we started breeding this interesting species in 2009. It will be a little while longer before keepers will be able to sex this calf, who was born on 15th May, as it is keeping close to its protective new parent. More experienced at the parenting game, the Bukhara deer welcomed another calf to the herd. This little youngster, who is doting mum Mariam's 3rd calf, was born on 26th May and is a female but she has yet to be named. Following the birth of our first European bison calf, Glen Garry, on May 1st, a further two were born on the 26th and 31st of May. These three calves are the first offspring of our Irish-born bull, Tomek, who arrived at the Park in July 2011 Douglas Richardson, Animal Collections Manager at the Highland Wildlife Park, said: "As all of our animals are adapted to dealing with cold winters, late spring is usually when we start to see births from our hoofed mammals as they are generally very seasonal breeders. I am particularly pleased by the birth of a further two European bison calves as it is now looking like our new bull has justified his move from Ireland. The two latest bison mums are proving to be as protective of their calves as the mother of our first calf of the year. It is also gratifying to know that our herd is continuing to contribute to the European breeding programme for this endangered species, which we manage. "The husbandry of European elk presents a number of difficulties, but the fact that first-time mum Froja, who was also born at the Park, is proving to be an attentive parent indicates to us that we are caring for this demanding species in an appropriate way. "Lastly, our adult Bukhara deer female has had their third healthy calf in as many years. Bigger than their red relatives, their young can be easily identified due to their much darker coat that is covered in bright white spots. Our group is the only breeding herd of Bukhara deer in the UK, and like the bison they are part of a European breeding programme, and we are proud to be able to continue to help grow the population of this threatened deer". Photos should be credited to Jan Morse

  • Zoo Babies 2012

    A yet unnamed male Asian elephant baby (Elephas maximus) stands next to his mother Nova, left, at the Tierpark Zoo in Berlin Thursday May 10, 2012. The baby was born Tuesday May 8. (Timur Emek, dapd / AP)

  • Zoo Babies 2012

    In this May 12, 2012 photo released by the Detroit Zoological Society, Bulgan, a 3-week-old male Bactrian camel is shown on exhibit in Royal Oak, Mich. Bulgan will now be on display with the Detroit Zoo's three other camels. (Mark M. Gaskill, Detroit Zoological Society / AP)

  • Zoo Babies 2012

    Savanna, a nine-day-old baby zebra, stands next to her mother on her first day in front of the public, Thursday, May 31, 2012, at the Cincinnati Zoo in Cincinnati. (Al Behrman, AP)

  • Zoo Babies 2012

    Two newborn red vari lemurs are on their first trip through their enclosure at the Zoo in Wuppertal, Germany, Thursday, July 12, 2012. The lemurs originate from Madagascar and its the first time babies have been born. Picture taken through glass pane. (Frank Augstein, AP)

  • Zoo Babies 2012

    In this Sept. 23, 2012 photo provided by Utah's Hogle Zoo, mother giraffe Kipenzi licks her baby girl shortly after birth. The new baby giraffe and her mother went on display at Utah's Hogle Zoo for the first time on Oct. 3, 2012. (Utah's Hogle Zoo / AP)

  • Zoo Babies 2012

    On Thursday, March 22, 2012, Oakland Zoo, gave a sneak peek at three baby river otters (two males and one female), in their night house. The otters were born to Ginger, river otter, on the afternoon of February 18, 2012. Each baby weighed approximately 150 grams at birth. "It is very important for baby otters to learn appropriate social behavior from their mothers, so we are happy that Ginger has been such a great mom and is raising such well-adjusted pups,” said Margaret Rousser, Zoological Manager. Currently, the pups are nursing, starting to open their eyes and are growing each day. In a few weeks, they will begin eating fish and meat. Zookeepers also say the babies are very vocal, especially the female. The baby otters will not go out on exhibit until May as they first need to learn how to swim (it’s not instinctual) and need to be a certain size before leaving the night house. The public will not see the baby otters on exhibit until the month of May.

  • Zoo Babies 2012

    Silbergibbon-Mama Pangrango (15 Jahre) sitzt am Freitag (14.09.12) im Tierpark Hellabrunn in Muenchen mit ihrem am 19. August 2012 geborenen Baby im Freigehege. Silbergibbons, die in freier Wildbahn nur auf der indonesischen Insel Java leben, gehoeren zu den bedrohtesten Primaten weltweit. In Deutschland finden sie sich nur im Tierpark Hellabrunn. (Uwe Lein, dapd / AP)

  • Zoo Babies 2012

    In this photo provided by the Little Rock Zoo and taken Nov.19, 2012, a three-week old African penguin is held in Little Rock, Ark. The bird, hatched at the zoo Oct. 30, 2012, will not be exhibited until it is about 70 days old or if its parents allow it to wander out of the nest. (AP Photo/Little Rock Zoo, Stephanie Hollister)

  • Zoo Babies 2012

    A five-hour-old, as yet un-named, baby hippopotamus feeds from it's mother Julka, in Belgrade Zoo, Saturday, Nov. 17, 2012. (Darko Vojinovic, AP)

  • Zoo Babies 2012

    In this photo taken Thursday, July 19, 2012, Matt Evans, supervisory biologist at the National Zoo's Reptile Discovery Center, holds a 13-day-old Cuban crocodile hatchling in Washington. Two crocodiles hatched from surprise eggs laid by a 50-something-year-old Cuban crocodile at the National Zoo. (Jacquelyn Martin, AP)

  • Zoo Babies 2012

    A mud covered 3-month-old male African Southern Rhino named Jumaane, looks at a minor bird at the Singapore Zoo on Tuesday, July 17, 2012 in Singapore. The zoo was actively involved in educating the public about wildlife conservation and was also successful in breeding endangered species within the Zoo's premises. This is Shova's seventh successful birth. (Wong Maye-E, AP)

  • Zoo Babies 2012

    A Silvery Gibbon holds her two-week-old baby at the Bali Zoo in Gianyar, Bali, Indonesia on Monday, Dec. 3, 2012. The Silvery Gibbon (Hylobates moloch) is currently listed as critically endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN). They are in danger mostly because of commercial deforestation. It is estimated that only 4% of their original native habitat is still available to the species. (Firdia Lisnawati, AP)

  • Zoo Babies 2012

    A two-month-old Barbary ape baby relaxes on its mother's back during warm temperatures in the Erfurt zoo, central Germany, Friday, Aug. 3, 2012. (Jens Meyer, AP)

  • Zoo Babies 2012

    In this Dec. 1, 2012 photo released by the Oregon Zoo, a one day old Asian elephant calf is shown in the elephant maternity ward with her mother Rose-Tu at the Oregon Zoo in Portland, Ore. The Oregon Zoo hopes to retain possession of the baby elephant that was born Friday in Portland, but it won't own the animal. The zoo confirms a report in The Seattle Times that the calf is owned by a Perris, Calif., company called Have Trunk Will Travel under a breeding contract that sent the father, Tusko, to the zoo in 2005. (Michael Durham, Oregon Zoo / AP)

  • Zoo Babies 2012

    A five-day-old baby hippopotamus swims next to its mother, Kibu, at the National Zoo in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Friday, Aug. 24, 2012. The calf, the offspring of 21-year-old Kibu and 31-year-old Duke, was born on the first day of Eid al-Fitr, which marks the end of the fasting month of Ramadan. (Lai Seng Sin, AP)

  • Zoo Babies 2012

    SeaWorld Orlando animal rescue team received two hawksbill turtle hatchlings earlier this week. They are approximately two months old. The first was found at Melbourne Beach by a tourist and was dropped off at the Sea Turtle Preservation Society in Melbourne Beach, Fla. It weighs only 2 ounces and is nearly 3 inches long. The turtle was in lethargic and weak condition when it arrived (photos 12 and 16) The second turtle was found in Cocoa Beach and also brought to the Sea Turtle Preservation Society. It weighs 2.5 ounces and is just over 3 inches long. (photo 17) This turtle was covered with algae and fauna, as seen in the photo. Both hatchlings were brought to SeaWorld for examination and continued care, including, feeding, giving fluids and around-the-clock observation and monitoring. Because of their age and size, they're living in a small brooder where the temperature is kept at a constant 84 degrees. They are in the water several times throughout the day but also spend time dry in order to conserve their energy. The turtles are taken home in their brooder each night by a turtle expert (aquarist) for middle-of-the-night feedings. It's a tough journey ahead but both turtles are looking better and are showing positive signs. Hawksbill turtles are endangered due to human exploitation and habitat degradation. This year, SeaWorld Orlando has rescued 10 sea turtles and released three. For more than 45 years, SeaWorld Parks & Entertainment has helped animals in need -- ill, injured and orphaned. More than 20,000 animals have been rescued by our experts.‪ SeaWorld's animal rescue team is on call 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. ‪

  • Zoo Babies 2012

    Father Weedy Sea Dragon Gives Birth at SeaWorld Orlando A rare and exciting event has taken place at SeaWorld Orlando. A weedy sea dragon has given birth to his first few baby sea dragons. This is the first time sea dragon eggs have successfully hatched at a SeaWorld park and is considered a very extraordinary occurrence in aquariums around the world. In fact, there have only been three other aquariums in the United States to successfully breed weedy sea dragons. Like the closely related sea horse, male sea dragons are actually the ones in charge of bearing young. The female deposits the eggs onto a spongy patch found on the underside of the male's tail. The eggs are fertilized during this transfer and remain on their father for the next five to nine weeks. Dad is responsible for incubation and care of the eggs until they reach full term. Close to 100 eggs were laid by the female in June and will continue to hatch over the next couple of weeks. Once the eggs hatch, the tiny sea dragons are on their own. They'll receive nutrition by absorbing the remains of their yolk sac and from zooplankton found in the water. Once the egg sac has been absorbed, the newborns will begin feeding on newly hatched brine shrimp. The baby sea dragons will take around a year to reach full size. The sea dragon is a protected animal found naturally in tropical coastal waters of south and west Australia. Due to human invasion and pollution, the numbers of sea dragons that live in their natural environment have drastically dropped since the 1980s. The weedy sea dragons can normally be seen at SeaWorld in the aquarium exhibit inside Manta.

  • Zoo Babies 2012

    A baby greater flamingo stands next to the adult birds at Ueno Zoo in Tokyo, Tuesday, Aug. 28, 2012. (Itsuo Inouye, AP)

  • Zoo Babies 2012

    A new born Asian Elephant Anachli walks next to the mother at the official presentation at the Zoo in Berlin, Wednesday, Aug. 15, 2012. The female elephant baby was born on Sunday, Aug 12, 2012. (Markus Schreiber, AP)

  • Zoo Babies 2012

    One of the Amur tiger twin cubs (Panthera tigris altaica) yawns near mother 'Bella' during their first walks in the enclosure in the Leipzig Zoo in Leipzig, central Germany Sunday, Sept. 30, 2012. Two Amur tiger babies were born on July 20, 2012. (Jens Meyer, AP)

  • Zoo Babies 2012

    A baby dusky wallaby (Thylogale Brunii), right, which was born on Oct. 6, clings to its mother at Bali zoo in Gianyar, Bali, Indonesia, Monday, Dec. 3, 2012. (Firdia Lisnawati, AP)

  • Zoo Babies 2012

    In this photo taken on Thursday, Sept. 27, 2012, Tori, a female orangutan carries her baby at Satwa Taru Jurug zoo in Solo, Central Java, Indonesia. Tori, known as one of the female orangutans which like to smoke cigaret that was given by zoo visitors, gave birth to the baby on Wednesday, Sept. 26, 2012. (AP)